Bye-Bye, Beta! Hello, New Design

It is our honour and pleasure to launch Our World web magazine’s new design. We hope that returning readers find it even more accessible than our newly retired beta version. First time visitors are encouraged to jump right in with both feet.

Having attained the mature age of 20 months, Our World has become an engaging and respected voice speaking (in English and Japanese) about the most urgent topics of our time. Our new look is simply the next step in our drive to combine a sophisticated magazine featuring high quality content with state-of-the-art design (2008 weblog awards ‘best design’ winner) and social media tools.

Back in our first post in July 2008, we outlined why certain global problems (originally climate, oil and food — with biodiversity being added later) were to be our key themes. At the time, during the height of the global financial crisis, we felt and still do that the world is witnessing a convergence of these critical issues like never before. People from varied fields of expertise and realms of experience must begin cooperating to solve the current and coming challenges.

We also spoke of how — just as Web 2.0 describes a new version of the web, one based on sharing and co-creation — we named the magazine to express our belief that the world was in need of the same collaborative spirit. With the launch of this new design, we recommit to exploring how to effectively use this powerful opportunity to help bring about widespread changes in the way the world works.

Over the past year and a half, we have been innovative in obtaining first hand and very personal indigenous perspectives on climate change and resource issues that are unfiltered and not widely covered. We have also distilled essential conventional scientific and policy information so as to make it as accessible as possible.

We would like to take this opportunity to thank all those who have contributed articles and all those who have allowed the use of their photos via Flickr.

Our biggest thanks goes to you, the readers. Thank you for your continued patronage, comments and feedback! We really appreciate it. We are particularly happy to know that so many students are using this webzine as a learning resource to support their studies.

For any first time visitors, we encourage you to become part of the Our World community — join us on Facebook, Mixi, YouTube, Vimeo, iTunes and don’t forget Twitter. If you like what you see, share us with your friends. Subscribing to our RSS feed is another great way to stay up-to-date with our stories. Handy buttons to do all of that are now at the top right of this post!

On our part, we will continue to strive to share original stories in the form of easy-to-read articles, short video briefs, podcasts and photo essays about outstanding people working for a more sustainable future. Our ultimate dream is to reach ever more readers, writers, viewers and commenters who can help us in upgrading our world!

Sincerely,

The Our World team

Creative Commons License
Bye-Bye, Beta! Hello, New Design by Carol Smith is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License.

JOIN THE DISCUSSION BELOW

Author

Carol Smith

Carol is a journalist with a green heart who believes that presenting information in a positive and accessible manner is key in activating more people to join the search for equitable and sustainable solutions to global problems. A native of Montreal, Canada, she joined the UNU communications team in 2008 while living in Tokyo and continues to collaborate from her current home in Vancouver.

Join the Discussion

  • Alain

    Congrats, gang, it looks great!

  • Kai

    I can’t seem to get OpenID to work here…

    Also not sure if the spelling is Web 2.0 or not, but this seems wrong:

    You may select one tolog into: <- tolog?

    • http://pejone.livejournal.com/ Oleg Butuzov

      Hi Kai,Your right. The discus realization of OpenId login is a bit buggy. I have succeeded in logging in only when using full url with slash at the end. I think we need to pass this information to Discus team. Same goes for the spelling error too.

  • AlanZulch

    Nice work! The new site feels like a significant improvement. With the enhanced navigation I’ve already found quite a bit of content that I’d never known existed. I’m very pleased about that!

  • BrendanBarrett

    Hi Alain, Kai and Alan,

    Thanks for your comments. Very much appreciated.

    Kai, will get our developed to take a look at the log in issue. Not sure if it is our side or something to do with how Disqus works.

    Brendan

  • JamesStein

    Young Americans trust banks much more with managing mobile payments than Facebook and other social media and technology companies (Apple very much included).  That is the surprising conclusion of a new study.  Perhaps even more surprisingly, the survey was conducted in November, when the fury against banks’ debit card fees reached its climax.

    The only way I can make any kind of sense of these results is that the youngsters’ familiarity with all potential m-payments providers leads them to trust each one of them to provide solely the types of services they specialize in.  So Facebook should stick to social media, Apple – to making cool gadgets, but mobile payments should be processed by banks.  http://blog.unibulmerchantservices.com/young-americans-may-love-facebook-but-leave-mobile-payments-to-banks